Millennial Burnout

I was reading an interesting article earlier this week about Millennial Burnout. If I’m honest, it isn’t something I’d heard much about before. On first glance, it may just sound like another excuse. A reason to dwell or simply admit that perhaps that’s why things aren’t working out or going to plan.

First discussed by Ann Helen Peterson, Millennial Burnout concerns those aged between 22-38 – the Millennial generation. It’s the concept that says this age group, specifically, feels an enormous amount of pressure to succeed and work hard. This undue stress can then lead to anxiety, fatigue and dread. So much so that work almost consumes them, meaning the more menial, everyday tasks become almost impossible. 

I must admit, parts of Peterson’s article – titled ‘How Millennials became the Burnout Generation’ – did resonate. The feeling that you should always be busy is definitely something I’m guilty of. I find it hard to relax these days without feeling as though I should be doing something. Painting, reading, work, socialising, house chores or DIY. There is a need, a pressure, to get through my seemingly never-ending to-do list. A list that I’ve written myself. And one that will have no dire consequences if I don’t tick everything off. Something I’m starting to realise more and more.

It’s often suggested that social media plays a huge role in Millennial Burnout. Whether this is through a desire to impress or keep up – with the ever-growing trend of comparison – I think we can all agree we’ve felt this at one point or another as we scroll through these ‘perfect’ feeds. It’s certainly something that the generation before us didn’t have. Perhaps they even worked harder, but there wasn’t this need to prove it – so why is there now?

With a week off following the Bank Holiday, I’ve made a note of the things I’d like to do. Projects I’d like to do around the house, books I’d like to read and places I’d like to visit. At the same time though, I want to try and relax. With what feels like my busiest ever year at work, it’s so important to switch off and forget. To spend time doing things that actually make you happy.