Monochrome: A Different Perspective

When we think of monochrome in fashion, our minds tend to wander to black, white and greys. Neutral, classic colours without much colour. 

For many, this is a popular colour palette to wear. It is clean, crisp and chic and works both at the office and day-to-day. It is synonymous with sophistication, style and effortlessness.

Saying that, I possess very little black in my wardrobe, and so I have always considered my style and sense of fashion to be void of ‘monochrome’; always preferring colour and pattern. And yet, I was watching a very interesting video the other day about a monochromatic wardrobe, and how to wear all one colour, whatever that shade may be. Because actually, while we associate monochrome with black and white, it actually means ‘one colour’. So, if you choose to wear bold reds or emerald greens, you’re technically still advocating a monochromatic wardrobe, it’s just in a different sense of the word.

Photo: Instagram @ninasandbech

I’ve never really thought of it like this, despite enjoying wearing lots of creams together, or all-yellow outfits to inject a little brightness.

Red jeans with a lighter red jumper, a lilac midi skirt with a soft violet blouse, or blue peg leg trousers with a mint green knit and royal blue coat. Sometimes, we tend to shy away from wearing too much colour, but actually, this train of sartorial thought puts a different perspective on colour and how to wear it. Mixing and matching different tones of one shade.

Photo: Instagram @venswifestyle

You can think about this in terms of accessories too. Matching your outfit to your bag, shoes or even your nails. Wearing monochrome then isn’t limiting or only referencing all black or white outfits, it’s actually a brilliant way of playing with colour and finding the palette that best complements you. 

You could a have ‘blue monochrome’ wardrobe – different tones of blue paired with cream and grey, for example – or a ‘brown monochrome’ wardrobe that revolves around lots of tan and camel tones, mixed in off whites and hints of navy.

It’s an interesting way of looking at your wardrobe and your personal style. Of actually injecting a little colour and pushing the boundaries of what it means to dress in monochrome.